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Home | Entries about Reporting on Performance (11), in reverse date order:

Generalizing The Apdex Standard [2]

Illustration: Apdex Logo

Today the Apdex specification is entirely focused on application response time. Its first paragraph defines Apdex as “a method for calculating and reporting a metric of transactional application response time in the form of an index with a value of 0 to 1.” But in reality, the Apdex method has much wider applicability. A more appropriate description might be the general statement that Apdex is a metric that reflects the degree to which a set of performance measurements achieves designated targets.

The idea of generalizing the Apdex standard has been discussed periodically within the Apdex community. To turn those discussions from an abstract idea into a concrete proposal, I’m writing a series of posts on the Apdex Exchange blog ...

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Apdex as a (Key) Performance Indicator

Illustration: Apdex Logo

On the Apdex Exchange blog, I’m writing a series of posts about Generalizing The Apdex Standard. The ideas I developed (together with any public input) will evolve into a new draft of the Apdex specification. The latest post is on Apdex as a (Key) Performance Indicator. Here's a brief introduction:

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Choosing Performance Management Tools

Illustration: Apdex Logo

With over 30 application performance management (APM) tool vendors offering scores of products, buyers face hundreds of confusing choices. Compounding the problem, the lack of a common taxonomy, or standard APM nomenclature, makes cross-vendor product comparisons especially challenging.

To address this challenge, NetForecast has developed an APM tools framework anyone can use to define APM requirements and map them to vendor offerings. On June 30 2010, Peter Sevcik will describe this framework in a Webinar hosted by the Apdex Alliance ...

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Service Level Management with Apdex

Illustration: Apdex Logo

Service level management (SLM) is the art and science of keeping application services running properly once in production. The key to successful SLM is the ability to use metrics that are linked to the business.

Apdex (Application Performance Index) is an open standard that is a numerical measure of user satisfaction with the performance of enterprise applications. It converts many measurements into one number on a uniform scale of 0-to-1 (0 = no users satisfied, 1 = all users satisfied).

Properly implemented, Apdex enables an organization to link application performance to business needs ...

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Generalizing The Apdex Standard

Illustration: Apdex Logo

Today the Apdex specification is entirely focused on application response time. Its first paragraph defines Apdex as “a method for calculating and reporting a metric of transactional application response time in the form of an index with a value of 0 to 1.”

But in reality, the Apdex method is much more widely applicable, and a more appropriate description is already spelled out in the first paragraph of the Wikipedia article on Apdex ...

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Where Performance Meets Availability

Illustration: Stopwatch

Earlier posts about Acceptable Response Times have discussed how a Web site or application's responsiveness can Delight, Satisfy, or Frustrate customers.

Availability, on the other hand, is a measure of a system's stability. It is not a performance metric, it is a software (or hardware) quality metric.

So, technically speaking, performance and availability are orthogonal issues. Practically speaking, however, availability and responsiveness are interconnected concepts.

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Web Analytics Vendors Adapt to Web 2.0

Illustration: Web Analytics Report

Most hosted Web Analytics vendors charge you according to page views -- not unreasonable since each view is a call to their server and a new record in their database. But what happens when Ajax and other rich applications eliminate the notion of a "page"?

That's from Web 2.0 Changes Web Analytics Pricing Models, a recent post by Phil Kemelor in CMP's Intelligent Enterprise Weblog. Describing how he sees Web Analytics (WA) vendors adapting to Web 2.0, Phil continues ...

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Lies, Damned Lies, And Statistics

The Law of Measurements

Performance Wisdom: 8

The result of any measurement will depend upon what is measured, how the measurement is done, and how the results are computed

Recent posts have discussed some insightful statements about the importance of measurements by Lord Kelvin, Grace Hopper, Tom DeMarco, and Tom Gilb.

In the last of these, I concluded that Gilb's observation (Anything you need to quantify can be measured in some way that is superior to not measuring it at all) gets across the value of measurements without making any claims that are too far-reaching or contentious.

A follow-up comment and the ensuing conversation with Ben Simo -- author of Quality Frog, a blog about software testing and software quality -- reminded me of this post, which I'd been meaning to complete and publish for a while. I'll explain the reasons for the delay below.

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Reporting Web Application Responsiveness

Illustration: Monitor and AJAX

In a previous post, I discussed some complications of measuring Rich Internet Applications (RIAs). In particular, I concluded that to report useful measurements of the user experience of response times, …

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The ABC's of Measurement Data

Illustration: Greek alphabet

In my experience, companies usually have lots of measurement tools. Granted, some of them do sit on the shelf unused, but many are in use -- some even collecting data continuously. Despite all this data gathering, the value obtained from the data is often a lot less than it might be. Data is meaningless unless it's interpreted and applied; as a medieval scribe might have said, graecum est; non potest legi. Today I will describe a framework for addressing this concern.

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